- Exclusions: Select cat furniture; ORIJEN, ACANA, Taste of the Wild, Hill's Pet Nutrition food and treats (Hill's Prescription Diet, Hill's Science Diet, Hill's Ideal Balance and Hill's Bioactive Recipe); select Purina brands (Pro Plan, Muse, Beyond and select Tidy Cats products); Petsafe Brands (PetSafe, SportDOG, Frolicat, Drinkwell, Solvit', ScoopFree, Pet Loo, Gentle Leader, Mr. Herzher's and Piddle Place); Educator E-Collars; Playology; Dollar per Gallon tanks, 50% off or more tanks; select Precious Cat litter products; Zilla Critter Cages; WholeHearted Memberships, Repeat Delivery orders and subscriptions; out-of-stock items, prior purchases, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards.
Do you remember the very first time you put a leash on that cute, chubby little fur ball of a puppy you just adopted? You immediately click the leash on his collar (Oh look! The snap is almost as big as he is), you then begin to tug on the leash with the expectation that your new pup is going to automatically know what this thing is yanking on his neck. You laugh at him and maybe even praise him for flopping down on the floor and biting the leash. You drag him a bit, and then he takes a couple steps and then rolls over scratching and biting and flails around trying to escape the collar. Then the whole scenario repeats itself, all the while you are telling little rover he is a genius, a champ, the best pup in the world as he gnaws on the leash and flops all over the floor like a fish. Sound familiar?
Do you remember the very first time you put a leash on that cute, chubby little fur ball of a puppy you just adopted? You immediately click the leash on his collar (Oh look! The snap is almost as big as he is), you then begin to tug on the leash with the expectation that your new pup is going to automatically know what this thing is yanking on his neck. You laugh at him and maybe even praise him for flopping down on the floor and biting the leash. You drag him a bit, and then he takes a couple steps and then rolls over scratching and biting and flails around trying to escape the collar. Then the whole scenario repeats itself, all the while you are telling little rover he is a genius, a champ, the best pup in the world as he gnaws on the leash and flops all over the floor like a fish. Sound familiar?
Keep moving on a walk instead of stopping and chatting with others. While you and the other person are smiling and looking at each other, your dogs may be sending signals to one another that they are uncomfortable. Keep moving and stay focused on your dog’s body language. If your dog stiffens, growls, starts randomly sniffing or scratching, or you can see his hackles (among other warning signs that your dog is getting uncomfortable), do a U-turn and put something visual between you and the trigger upsetting your dog.
If you have a super strong pup on your hands and lots of room to walk, this leash might be for you. This sturdy rope leash comes with a shock-absorbing bungee cord extension that adds extra give for dogs who want to drag you down the street. While we wouldn't recommend using it in busy areas or with dogs who are prone to bolting, it can help make walking stubborn pullers more pleasant. 
If your dog is an extreme puller, you will want to opt for a leash designed specifically for control and guidance. The Leashboss has a handle built-in that curbs tugging and pulling, and gives the walker more control and strength over a headstrong dog. The leash comes in four different colors and is five feet in length, with a sturdy handle at 18". The company also provides a five-year “no hassle” warranty against wear and tear, or if it simply doesn’t work for your dog. Though this leash can work for any size pup, it works best for dogs over 40 lbs.
Cat leashes are used with the purpose of preventing the cat getting lost. Unlike dogs, cats rarely attack persons on the street, so cat leashes are mainly a safety measure to protect the pet itself. Very often the collars are replaced with harnesses, because they avoid the dangers of collars which include escaping and running away or choking. Cats are more likely to not be willing to be walked in a harness than dogs are, and are considered to need up to months to be able to adjust to wearing a harness.
Please remember to remain calm at all times, and utilize jackpots (more treats or better treats) when your dog accomplishes something that was difficult for him; i.e. not pulling you toward the neighbor dog! Jackpot for any eye contact or focus on you! Keep leash training sessions short and FUN! You can train several times a day, but you don’t want to push you or your dog past the point of fun! Puppies, especially, have short attention spans and if you insist on puppy training past the point of fun, usually around 5 to 15 minutes, your pup may start to dislike, and even dread training!
- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; select Pet Pharmacy brands (Bravecto, Tri-Heart Plus, Optimmune, Vetsulin, Salix, Incurin, Mometamax, Panacur, Otomax & Orbax); WholeHearted Memberships, add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
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