Teach a cue. Introduce your puppy to a sound cue that means, “food is coming.” Some people like to click and treat, some people use a word like “yes,” and some people cluck their tongue. Whichever you use, the method is the same: In a quiet, distraction-free area, with the puppy on a leash and collar, make the sound. The second your puppy turns toward you and/or looks at you, reward him with a treat. After a few repetitions, you’ll notice your puppy not only looking at you, but also coming over to you for the treat.

Do you remember the very first time you put a leash on that cute, chubby little fur ball of a puppy you just adopted? You immediately click the leash on his collar (Oh look! The snap is almost as big as he is), you then begin to tug on the leash with the expectation that your new pup is going to automatically know what this thing is yanking on his neck. You laugh at him and maybe even praise him for flopping down on the floor and biting the leash. You drag him a bit, and then he takes a couple steps and then rolls over scratching and biting and flails around trying to escape the collar. Then the whole scenario repeats itself, all the while you are telling little rover he is a genius, a champ, the best pup in the world as he gnaws on the leash and flops all over the floor like a fish. Sound familiar?


Or maybe, you have an older dog that walks you instead of you walking him. He pulls you all over the place, chases the neighborhood cat into the thorn bush up the street that you are now well acquainted with, and it seems like any time you pull back on the leash, Fido increases his speed! You decide he’s getting too big or too strong for you and before you know it, you are in traction at the chiropractor and your beloved pup is getting fat on the couch!
About the author: Annie Phenix, CPDT-KA, is a force-free professional dog trainer enjoying her mountain-filled life in Colorado. She is a member of the Pet Professional Guild and the National Association of Canine Scent Work. She takes her highly trained dogs with them everywhere dogs are welcome because of their exceptionally good manners. Join Annie on her dog-training Facebook page.
A professional (find one through The Pet Professional Guild) can help you train your dog to trust his environment and handler when he is on leash. Dogs can feel trapped by that lifeline. It’s vital that we teach them how we want them to behave when they see other dogs. These behaviors first must be taught in a safe, controlled setting such as a dog-training center.

If you’re looking for a leash that’s easy on the wallet, safe and durable, the Blueberry classic leash is a great choice. We love that it comes in 12 different colors and five sizes (ranging from four to five feet in various widths) so that it can work with nearly any dog. If your dog is easy on the leash and doesn’t require a lot of control or guidance, a standard nylon leash will do the job. We recommend this leash for dogs 75 lbs and under, as larger pups may need a stronger version.
Cat leashes come in a variety of colors, designs and models and are made of different materials. There are cat leashes made of leather, nylon and rope. Whereas the leather leash is one of the best qualities because of the characteristics of the material, it is also one of the most expensive and not very comfortable for the cat at the same time. Nylon cat leashes and harnesses are, however, more elastic, and thus more comfortable and also provide more control.
Your dog loves to walk, play and explore. Make pup adventures safe with top dog leashes and dog collars from Chewy. You’ll find the best dog leash for your furry friend including leashes from brands like PetSafe, Four Paws, Flexi leashes and ThunderLeash. PetSafe leashes are made of soft and durable nylon for the best nylon leashes, keeping you in control and your canine comfortable during walks. Flexi retractable leashes come in a variety of colors including reflective material for night walks. Dog leashes and dog leads come in a variety of styles, sizes and colors. Choose your dog leash based on your functional needs and style preference. Take into consideration your bowwow’s breed, and how they behave on walks when shopping for leashes online. If you’ve got a precious puppy on your hands, now is the perfect time to begin leash training. A retractable dog leash or dog lead is a great way to give your pup the best of both worlds. A retractable dog lead or leash makes it easy to give your pup room to play when it’s safe, but allows you to tighten the slack when you need to keep them close by. Also consider a hands free dog leash or a dog coupler. Find a large dog leash on Chewy for the big breed that’s your cuddly companion. For dogs who have issues on walks, a dog training leash is a great tool for correcting a misbehaving pup. Whether you’re shopping for a small dog leash for your tiny pup, or a strong dog lead for your huge hound, Chewy’s online pet shop has got a large selection of top dog leashes and the best dog supplies making it easy for you to find the perfect leash for your precious pup.
×