The clicker is a very effective training tool, that when conditioned with a reward like food, a treat or a toy signals to your puppy that he has done something right.  The clicking sound becomes synonymous with the reward/treat once training has begun. However, your puppy has to be taught that the clicker means something and clicking alone is not reinforcing anything.
Purposes of a leash include: preventing animals from frightening or biting people or other animals, defecating and urinating in inappropriate places, endangering traffic, digging up lawns, causing other damage, getting lost, and getting away from owners. Leashes also provide a clear method of communication and ensure control during training of dogs.
Keep moving on a walk instead of stopping and chatting with others. While you and the other person are smiling and looking at each other, your dogs may be sending signals to one another that they are uncomfortable. Keep moving and stay focused on your dog’s body language. If your dog stiffens, growls, starts randomly sniffing or scratching, or you can see his hackles (among other warning signs that your dog is getting uncomfortable), do a U-turn and put something visual between you and the trigger upsetting your dog.
Even though your puppy may be learning to walk on a leash very nicely, you’re likely to run into some issues as he gets older, goes new places, and experiences new distractions. You’ll want to teach him loose-leash walking, because it’s much more pleasant for you both, and also then he can pass his Canine Good Citizen test. Here are a few tips on what to do if you’re having trouble with leash training, courtesy of the AKC GoodDog! Helpline.
Throw a meat treat in the direction of the oncoming dog, turn on your heels, and walk away. I cannot even count the number of dog owners who are shocked that as their dog is being harassed by the off-leash dog, the owner of stands there, saying nothing, and doesn’t help to put an end to the situation. If another person is walking with you, ask them to attempt to catch the oncoming dog as you leave the scene (you have to decide in an instant if that would be a safe maneuver or not because breaking up a dog fight is an excellent way to get bitten).

Keep moving on a walk instead of stopping and chatting with others. While you and the other person are smiling and looking at each other, your dogs may be sending signals to one another that they are uncomfortable. Keep moving and stay focused on your dog’s body language. If your dog stiffens, growls, starts randomly sniffing or scratching, or you can see his hackles (among other warning signs that your dog is getting uncomfortable), do a U-turn and put something visual between you and the trigger upsetting your dog.
States that do not have statewide leash laws are Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wyoming.
With a padded glove-like handle, the EzyDog offers ultimate comfort for every pet owner. It’s a great choice for runners and joggers who don’t want to focus on gripping a standard leash. It has a shock-reducing bungee that takes some of the strain away if a dog lunges or pulls incessantly. The EzyDog is adjustable from 36" to 48" and the glove fits any size hand. It’s also a great choice for dog owners who suffer from arthritis or other hand conditions, as it reduces the need to grip tightly around a thin nylon leash.
Your dog loves to walk, but do you love walking your dog? If you are finding yourself being dragged around by your curious canine, tied up in leash knots, it’s probably time to start dog leash training. It may come as a surprise to first time pup parents, but dogs don’t naturally have dog leash skills. Leash skills must be taught, and the skill doesn’t always come easily. Dogs are naturally faster than us, and get excited when exploring the outdoors. Leash training helps your pup know not to pull ahead or lag behind you, even when there’s something engaging them outside. Get help training your furry friend with dog collars, dog slip leads or other dog training leads and dog harnesses from Chewy. Walking a big dog who isn’t leash trained can lead to accidents and injury. With the help of a dog training leash, you can get your pooch to prance alongside you, instead of around and through you. Chewy carries top dog training leash brands like PetSafe leashes, Four Paws leashes, Flexi leashes and ThunderLeash. The Flexi training leash is a great training tool, because it’s easy to control. You can provide excess slack or reign in your pup quickly and with ease. The Four Paws training lead may look simple in comparison to other leashes, but it’s a great tool for leash training. The solid bronze clip swivels and adds extra durability, perfect for reigning in a dare devil dog. Chewy also offers top dog training collar brands like Starmark, PetSafe and Sport DOG dog collars. For the best dog training collars for your dog, consider how they respond to training, what factors motivate them, and what you feel most comfortable with. On Chewy, you’ll find dog bark collars, dog tie outs, dog id tags, aid in leash training and more. Find all the dog training equipment you need at Chewy's online pet store where you find the best dog supplies.
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