Even though your puppy may be learning to walk on a leash very nicely, you’re likely to run into some issues as he gets older, goes new places, and experiences new distractions. You’ll want to teach him loose-leash walking, because it’s much more pleasant for you both, and also then he can pass his Canine Good Citizen test. Here are a few tips on what to do if you’re having trouble with leash training, courtesy of the AKC GoodDog! Helpline.
Our training will give you the best opportunity to be successful and lead a very happy and rewarding life with your dog. The most amazing part is to watch as your confidence grows as the training progresses; from a person who has been stressed out their entire time they’ve had their dog, to stress-free. We can take your guilt or embarrassment your dog may be causing and turn that into pride and happiness. 
If your pup lunges: If your dog is going after something while on a walk — another dog, a car, a skateboarder, for example, be proactive. Try to redirect his attention with a treat before he has a chance to lunge, and increase the space between your dog and the target. Stay alert and be prepared before the target of his frustration gets too close. This type of behavior may be more common in herding breeds, but any dog can be startled by something he’s not used to or finds exciting.
Indiana is one of the states that has a restraint statute, which means that dogs must be restrained at all times. Otherwise, if the dog bites a person when not restrained the owner is subject to civil liability and criminal penalties. (Cite needed; definition of "restraint" needed; discussion of local Indiana ordinances forbidding dog tethering needed.)
Keep moving on a walk instead of stopping and chatting with others. While you and the other person are smiling and looking at each other, your dogs may be sending signals to one another that they are uncomfortable. Keep moving and stay focused on your dog’s body language. If your dog stiffens, growls, starts randomly sniffing or scratching, or you can see his hackles (among other warning signs that your dog is getting uncomfortable), do a U-turn and put something visual between you and the trigger upsetting your dog.

By simply teaching your dog good leash walking manners you will keep your puppy and yourself safe while you are out walking! Most people try to leash train their dogs on their own, and usually end up making the problem worse leaving both pup and owner frustrated and confused. Sometimes, the problem is that dog owners are relying on aversive training tools like Choke Chains and Prong Collars. Although these barbaric tools may work in short term, owners find out they have absolutely NO control without those collars!
Please remember to remain calm at all times, and utilize jackpots (more treats or better treats) when your dog accomplishes something that was difficult for him; i.e. not pulling you toward the neighbor dog! Jackpot for any eye contact or focus on you! Keep leash training sessions short and FUN! You can train several times a day, but you don’t want to push you or your dog past the point of fun! Puppies, especially, have short attention spans and if you insist on puppy training past the point of fun, usually around 5 to 15 minutes, your pup may start to dislike, and even dread training!

Consider why puppies pull when they are walking; there are many things that tempt your dog when you’re out for a walk, like children playing in the yard across the street, you neighbor grilling some hot dogs and that squirrel in the tree at the park. Your pup will try to get where he wants to go, even if that means pulling you along with him! If he pulls on the leash and you allow him to, you’ve reinforced that pulling gets him what he wants. Once you’ve allowed him to do this, he’ll do it again and again:
Your dog loves to walk, but do you love walking your dog? If you are finding yourself being dragged around by your curious canine, tied up in leash knots, it’s probably time to start dog leash training. It may come as a surprise to first time pup parents, but dogs don’t naturally have dog leash skills. Leash skills must be taught, and the skill doesn’t always come easily. Dogs are naturally faster than us, and get excited when exploring the outdoors. Leash training helps your pup know not to pull ahead or lag behind you, even when there’s something engaging them outside. Get help training your furry friend with dog collars, dog slip leads or other dog training leads and dog harnesses from Chewy. Walking a big dog who isn’t leash trained can lead to accidents and injury. With the help of a dog training leash, you can get your pooch to prance alongside you, instead of around and through you. Chewy carries top dog training leash brands like PetSafe leashes, Four Paws leashes, Flexi leashes and ThunderLeash. The Flexi training leash is a great training tool, because it’s easy to control. You can provide excess slack or reign in your pup quickly and with ease. The Four Paws training lead may look simple in comparison to other leashes, but it’s a great tool for leash training. The solid bronze clip swivels and adds extra durability, perfect for reigning in a dare devil dog. Chewy also offers top dog training collar brands like Starmark, PetSafe and Sport DOG dog collars. For the best dog training collars for your dog, consider how they respond to training, what factors motivate them, and what you feel most comfortable with. On Chewy, you’ll find dog bark collars, dog tie outs, dog id tags, aid in leash training and more. Find all the dog training equipment you need at Chewy's online pet store where you find the best dog supplies.
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