- Exclusions: ORIJEN, ACANA, over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; select Pet Pharmacy brands (Bravecto, Tri-Heart Plus, Optimmune, Vetsulin, Salix, Incurin, Mometamax, Panacur, Otomax & Orbax); WholeHearted Memberships, add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
Even though your puppy may be learning to walk on a leash very nicely, you’re likely to run into some issues as he gets older, goes new places, and experiences new distractions. You’ll want to teach him loose-leash walking, because it’s much more pleasant for you both, and also then he can pass his Canine Good Citizen test. Here are a few tips on what to do if you’re having trouble with leash training, courtesy of the AKC GoodDog! Helpline.

Dog leashes are used to walk the dog in public places. Having the dog wear a leash is a way of protecting the dog and other persons (e.g., if the dog runs away and bites someone). Also, the length is one of the important aspects of the leash. The length of the leash must be chosen according to the size of the dog and it is important because it allows a good control. Leashes should not be either too long or too short. Too long leashes do not provide good control of the pet which can result in unpleasant accidents with more aggressive dogs whereas too short leashes are uncomfortable for both the dog and the owner. The perfect leash can restrain the dog but at the same time is not viewed as a punishment for the pet.[9]
Make the puppy come to you. While he’s on his way to you, still wearing the leash and collar, back up a few paces and then reward him when he gets to you. Continue the progression until your puppy, upon hearing the cue noise, comes to you and walks with you a few paces. Remember that puppies have a short attention span, so keep your sessions short, and end them when your puppy is still eager to do more, not when he’s mentally exhausted.
Now, you may begin allowing your pooch to wear them around the house, increasing the wear time. Keep your pup inside with you, during the beginning of training to help him be successful (training outside can be distracting), and click and reward every time he chooses to be near you while he wears the collar and leash, and remember, consistency is key here. Also click and reward if he looks up at you, this is the foundation to getting his focus-You want his attention to be on you!
Take it outside. Finally, you’re ready to test your puppy’s skills in the Great Outdoors. There will be new challenges with this step because all the sounds, smells, and sights your puppy encounters will be intriguing and new to him. Be patient and keep the first walks short. While you’re on a walk, if your puppy looks as if he’s about to lunge toward something or is about to get distracted (you’ll notice this because you will keep your eyes on him at all times), make your cue sound and move a few steps away. Then reward him with a treat for following you.
If you’re looking for a leash that’s easy on the wallet, safe and durable, the Blueberry classic leash is a great choice. We love that it comes in 12 different colors and five sizes (ranging from four to five feet in various widths) so that it can work with nearly any dog. If your dog is easy on the leash and doesn’t require a lot of control or guidance, a standard nylon leash will do the job. We recommend this leash for dogs 75 lbs and under, as larger pups may need a stronger version.

You want to reinforce behavior you like, such as when your dog looks at but does not react to another dog a good distance away. If you have to stop an incoming assault from an off-leash dog, you can yell “SIT!” at the oncoming dog (sometimes it works) and then throw your meat treat on the ground near that dog and do a quick, calm U-turn and move away. Could the dog have some sort of meat allergy? Possibly. That’s just one more reason the dog’s owner should obey the leash laws.
With a padded glove-like handle, the EzyDog offers ultimate comfort for every pet owner. It’s a great choice for runners and joggers who don’t want to focus on gripping a standard leash. It has a shock-reducing bungee that takes some of the strain away if a dog lunges or pulls incessantly. The EzyDog is adjustable from 36" to 48" and the glove fits any size hand. It’s also a great choice for dog owners who suffer from arthritis or other hand conditions, as it reduces the need to grip tightly around a thin nylon leash.
If you’re a pet parent to more than one pup, you probably know the struggle of tangled leashes and wishing you had more than two hands. The Vaun Duffy double leash is a great alternative to a traditional leash, offering a pet owner the ability to hold only one leash for two dogs. The Vaun Duffy attaches to a traditional leash and features a swivel clasp that’s designed to keep your dogs from getting tangled up. Each leash also has a neoprene padded handle so you can have more control over one or both dogs during lunging or pulling episodes.
The best dog leash should be sturdy enough to stand the test of time (or the occasional chomp) without immediately fraying or snapping. It must also have a clasp that's easy to attach to your dog's collar or harness and always shuts tight once you click it closed. And for the fashionista dog moms among us, it helps to find one that looks as adorable as your pup does, too!
×