Do you remember the very first time you put a leash on that cute, chubby little fur ball of a puppy you just adopted? You immediately click the leash on his collar (Oh look! The snap is almost as big as he is), you then begin to tug on the leash with the expectation that your new pup is going to automatically know what this thing is yanking on his neck. You laugh at him and maybe even praise him for flopping down on the floor and biting the leash. You drag him a bit, and then he takes a couple steps and then rolls over scratching and biting and flails around trying to escape the collar. Then the whole scenario repeats itself, all the while you are telling little rover he is a genius, a champ, the best pup in the world as he gnaws on the leash and flops all over the floor like a fish. Sound familiar?
Throw a meat treat in the direction of the oncoming dog, turn on your heels, and walk away. I cannot even count the number of dog owners who are shocked that as their dog is being harassed by the off-leash dog, the owner of stands there, saying nothing, and doesn’t help to put an end to the situation. If another person is walking with you, ask them to attempt to catch the oncoming dog as you leave the scene (you have to decide in an instant if that would be a safe maneuver or not because breaking up a dog fight is an excellent way to get bitten).
About the author: Annie Phenix, CPDT-KA, is a force-free professional dog trainer enjoying her mountain-filled life in Colorado. She is a member of the Pet Professional Guild and the National Association of Canine Scent Work. She takes her highly trained dogs with them everywhere dogs are welcome because of their exceptionally good manners. Join Annie on her dog-training Facebook page.

If your pup lunges: If your dog is going after something while on a walk — another dog, a car, a skateboarder, for example, be proactive. Try to redirect his attention with a treat before he has a chance to lunge, and increase the space between your dog and the target. Stay alert and be prepared before the target of his frustration gets too close. This type of behavior may be more common in herding breeds, but any dog can be startled by something he’s not used to or finds exciting.

An important aspect of dog leashes is their sturdiness. Although rope leashes are quite cheap, they are vulnerable to chewing and fraying and are not amongst the most recommended types of leashes. However, it is considered that a better type of leash is the one made of nylon because this material provides a bit of elasticity which is meant to result in more comfort for the dog. On the other hand, nylon leashes can cause chafe or can cut into the skin of the dog.
Scheduling multiple training sessions throughout the day will help your dog learn more quickly because dogs like schedules and he will depend on, and look forward with happy anticipation until you can go out again! I like training right before breakfast, lunch and dinner because my pups are hungry and pay more attention to me, and I can even use their kibble (food) for reward!
This two-layer leash is tougher than typical nylon leashes, but light enough to be comfortable for everyday use. We think this product stands apart from its competitors because it’s priced right, comes in five different colors and even has a money-back guarantee. It comes in two sizes, a one-layer version for smaller dogs and the standard two-layer for medium to large. We love the soft padded handle that’s built in for comfort, helping you avoid burns from pulling and lunging.
Throw a meat treat in the direction of the oncoming dog, turn on your heels, and walk away. I cannot even count the number of dog owners who are shocked that as their dog is being harassed by the off-leash dog, the owner of stands there, saying nothing, and doesn’t help to put an end to the situation. If another person is walking with you, ask them to attempt to catch the oncoming dog as you leave the scene (you have to decide in an instant if that would be a safe maneuver or not because breaking up a dog fight is an excellent way to get bitten).
From dog collars and reflective harnesses to leashes with a little bling, PetSmart has everything you need to keep your pup safe and looking their best. In addition to the cutest dog collars for pups of all sizes, we carry training collars and no-pull harnesses to help keep your pet secure and well-mannered when out on the town, sitting in the car or walking at the park. Find accessories such as ID tags, collar charms, GPS pet trackers and belt clips, as well as lifting aids for enhanced mobility for older dogs.
×