Even though your puppy may be learning to walk on a leash very nicely, you’re likely to run into some issues as he gets older, goes new places, and experiences new distractions. You’ll want to teach him loose-leash walking, because it’s much more pleasant for you both, and also then he can pass his Canine Good Citizen test. Here are a few tips on what to do if you’re having trouble with leash training, courtesy of the AKC GoodDog! Helpline.
This leash comes with a comfy padded handle and ring for waste bags, giving you and your best friend the perfect set-up for a long walk. It comes in a variety of lengths, and shorter leashes work great for crowded urban areas or anywhere you want to keep your furry friend close. A swivel clasp at the collar end gives your dog plenty of mobility, and double-woven nylon will last for years. 
Purposes of a leash include: preventing animals from frightening or biting people or other animals, defecating and urinating in inappropriate places, endangering traffic, digging up lawns, causing other damage, getting lost, and getting away from owners. Leashes also provide a clear method of communication and ensure control during training of dogs.
There are also bicycle dog leashes, especially designed for people who enjoy taking their pet in a ride with the bike. The leash is an aluminum tube with a plastic coated cable which runs down through the tube. It extends out of the tube end a couple of feet to allow for ease of movement for the dog. One end connects to the bike and the other to the dog's collar. This keeps them safely away the bike.[1]
As the unleashed dog comes at you, push the button and unleash the umbrella. We aren’t trying to hurt the dog – we are trying to but a barrier between your leashed dog and the outlaw dog. Be aware that if you use an umbrella, throw meat at the oncoming off-leash dog, or use a citronella spray, you are in a way escalating a bad situation. Or, it’s more accurate to say that you are being put in a position that may escalate because of the other owner’s irresponsibility. I’ve had two clients get into fistfights with other owners after spraying an oncoming dog with citronella. On the other hand, we have to protect our dogs. If you use a defensive move, do so carefully cautiously and as a last resort and understand that it might cause more human strife.
Teach a cue. Introduce your puppy to a sound cue that means, “food is coming.” Some people like to click and treat, some people use a word like “yes,” and some people cluck their tongue. Whichever you use, the method is the same: In a quiet, distraction-free area, with the puppy on a leash and collar, make the sound. The second your puppy turns toward you and/or looks at you, reward him with a treat. After a few repetitions, you’ll notice your puppy not only looking at you, but also coming over to you for the treat.
Scheduling multiple training sessions throughout the day will help your dog learn more quickly because dogs like schedules and he will depend on, and look forward with happy anticipation until you can go out again! I like training right before breakfast, lunch and dinner because my pups are hungry and pay more attention to me, and I can even use their kibble (food) for reward!
Scheduling multiple training sessions throughout the day will help your dog learn more quickly because dogs like schedules and he will depend on, and look forward with happy anticipation until you can go out again! I like training right before breakfast, lunch and dinner because my pups are hungry and pay more attention to me, and I can even use their kibble (food) for reward!
Your dog loves to walk, but do you love walking your dog? If you are finding yourself being dragged around by your curious canine, tied up in leash knots, it’s probably time to start dog leash training. It may come as a surprise to first time pup parents, but dogs don’t naturally have dog leash skills. Leash skills must be taught, and the skill doesn’t always come easily. Dogs are naturally faster than us, and get excited when exploring the outdoors. Leash training helps your pup know not to pull ahead or lag behind you, even when there’s something engaging them outside. Get help training your furry friend with dog collars, dog slip leads or other dog training leads and dog harnesses from Chewy. Walking a big dog who isn’t leash trained can lead to accidents and injury. With the help of a dog training leash, you can get your pooch to prance alongside you, instead of around and through you. Chewy carries top dog training leash brands like PetSafe leashes, Four Paws leashes, Flexi leashes and ThunderLeash. The Flexi training leash is a great training tool, because it’s easy to control. You can provide excess slack or reign in your pup quickly and with ease. The Four Paws training lead may look simple in comparison to other leashes, but it’s a great tool for leash training. The solid bronze clip swivels and adds extra durability, perfect for reigning in a dare devil dog. Chewy also offers top dog training collar brands like Starmark, PetSafe and Sport DOG dog collars. For the best dog training collars for your dog, consider how they respond to training, what factors motivate them, and what you feel most comfortable with. On Chewy, you’ll find dog bark collars, dog tie outs, dog id tags, aid in leash training and more. Find all the dog training equipment you need at Chewy's online pet store where you find the best dog supplies.
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