And because each dog collar & leash material has unique properties and advantages, it’s important to take note of your canine’s breed and the way they behave on walks. Young puppies have tons of energy and are eager to please, so with the right reward, it’s never too early to start leash training. If you know your small and adorable puppy is going to grow into a large and powerful canine, certain dog collars can keep proper walking manners clear from the very beginning. By consistently showing them how to walk the walk as puppies, you can reduce the chance of getting pulled and dragged, as they mature into muscular adults. And if they already have the ability to pull, it’s not too late to suit them up in front-clipping dog harnesses, so they can learn to trust your lead. In addition to being powerful training tools, dog harnesses can also provide your pup with added comfort when you need to suddenly pull on their leash and change the direction they’re walking or running towards. Successfully leash training your pup doesn’t just put your mind at ease, it also helps reduce anxiety in your pup as they realize that you are in control of the situation and can safely steer the pack. Keep your dog walks enjoyable for the two of you with the right accessories from Petco.
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Consider why puppies pull when they are walking; there are many things that tempt your dog when you’re out for a walk, like children playing in the yard across the street, you neighbor grilling some hot dogs and that squirrel in the tree at the park. Your pup will try to get where he wants to go, even if that means pulling you along with him! If he pulls on the leash and you allow him to, you’ve reinforced that pulling gets him what he wants. Once you’ve allowed him to do this, he’ll do it again and again:
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Take it outside. Finally, you’re ready to test your puppy’s skills in the Great Outdoors. There will be new challenges with this step because all the sounds, smells, and sights your puppy encounters will be intriguing and new to him. Be patient and keep the first walks short. While you’re on a walk, if your puppy looks as if he’s about to lunge toward something or is about to get distracted (you’ll notice this because you will keep your eyes on him at all times), make your cue sound and move a few steps away. Then reward him with a treat for following you.
About the author: Annie Phenix, CPDT-KA, is a force-free professional dog trainer enjoying her mountain-filled life in Colorado. She is a member of the Pet Professional Guild and the National Association of Canine Scent Work. She takes her highly trained dogs with them everywhere dogs are welcome because of their exceptionally good manners. Join Annie on her dog-training Facebook page.

Indiana is one of the states that has a restraint statute, which means that dogs must be restrained at all times. Otherwise, if the dog bites a person when not restrained the owner is subject to civil liability and criminal penalties. (Cite needed; definition of "restraint" needed; discussion of local Indiana ordinances forbidding dog tethering needed.)


This type of training is more effective because it builds a bond of trust and cooperation between animals and humans, the animals (and the humans) actually look forward to training! No one looks forward to punishment, or even the probability of punishment!  We all want to be told when we do something right, not belittled, hit or corrected when we do something wrong!
Since that article ran in June, three dogs who have graduated from my Growly Dog class have been attacked by off-leash dogs. My clients work hard to calm their dog’s anxiety when they see other dogs (which often stems from being attacked the very first time by a rude, off-leash dog!). We help these over-anxious dogs learn to trust their handler, and we rebuild their faith that they can walk safely in their own neighborhood. We make significant progress in keeping these dogs calm and focused on their owners instead of hyper-vigilantly scanning for dangers . . . such as an off-leash dog. In some of these cases, the unleashed dog owner was held responsible and now must pay fines in addition to medical bills; one of my clients ended up having an $8,000 hand surgery after breaking up a dog fight. I have enough stories like that to fill up a very long, pathetic book.
Even though your puppy may be learning to walk on a leash very nicely, you’re likely to run into some issues as he gets older, goes new places, and experiences new distractions. You’ll want to teach him loose-leash walking, because it’s much more pleasant for you both, and also then he can pass his Canine Good Citizen test. Here are a few tips on what to do if you’re having trouble with leash training, courtesy of the AKC GoodDog! Helpline.
Leash walking outside may be more frustrating because there are numerous distractions for you to compete with for your puppy’s attention. Understand, from his point of view, how much more difficult this task has now become, and whatever you do, don’t lose your patience; don’t drag him or allow him to drag you! Walk slowly and click and treat if he stays at your side. If he begins to pull, stop or change your direction, then click and treat when he reaches your side again!

Scheduling multiple training sessions throughout the day will help your dog learn more quickly because dogs like schedules and he will depend on, and look forward with happy anticipation until you can go out again! I like training right before breakfast, lunch and dinner because my pups are hungry and pay more attention to me, and I can even use their kibble (food) for reward!
The best dog leash should be sturdy enough to stand the test of time (or the occasional chomp) without immediately fraying or snapping. It must also have a clasp that's easy to attach to your dog's collar or harness and always shuts tight once you click it closed. And for the fashionista dog moms among us, it helps to find one that looks as adorable as your pup does, too!
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